Value of Minimalism.

Over the growing years, one keeps on hearing that maximum surpasses minimum, and addition holds greater value than subtraction, atleast that is so in the case of marks and grades. Hearing it over and over again, it somehow gets registered in one’s mind. Unconsciously, the need to have more then gets accepted as something vital.

In today’s world, gluttony has become such a natural sign that its presence doesn’t surprise more than its mere absence. The human mind drives the urge for people to crave for more and more, to attain more of everything. People tend to give too much meaning to things, thus often forsaking health, relationships, growth, passions, and desires.

Based on personal choice and the style of living, there are basically two kinds of people- the minimalist and the maximalist based on two interesting theories- Maximalism, while being completely opposite to minimalism, is more about clutter and excessive accumulation of things. As opposed to maximalism, minimalism doesn’t believe in attaching meaning to things.

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Minimalism isn’t just an extended term but a newer approach to living a fruitful life, thus projecting a fresh and unique perspective before others. It teaches to live a simple life with only fewer, basic and utmost important things. A minimalistic lifestyle takes some of the core things into account, like food, shelter, clothing and family bonding.

There’s a saying, “too many cooks spoil the broth,” which is indeed very true. If one tries juggling too many things at the same time then unfortunately sooner or later, everything will fall apart. To prevent this mishap, minimalism can act as one of the best saviour. Minimalism is not subtraction for the sake of subtraction, it is subtraction for the sake of focus.

Instead of focusing on everything and ending up focusing on nothing, it’s much better to prioritise and limit all the wants to only fewer ones, putting an end to the endless needs. If people focus on only the important things and learn to prioritise, then they actually end up having achieved quite alot of things to an unimaginably greater level.

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A maximalist is a materialistic person, one who judges his or her self-worth by power and wealth. They live their life following the principles of maximalism, where more is lesser than most, and most is lesser than the most. There’s no end to the desire of possessing materialistic things. The maximalist is a materialistic person, one who only attaches meanings to things rather than to emotions and people around them.

A minimalist is a non-materialistic person, one who attaches meanings to emotions and people around them, withdrawing their attention from materialistic things. Money is definitely a need in life but it should never be the other way round, i.e. the only need in life shouldn’t be money. Smiles, love, care, respect, happiness, family bonding, memories are more valuable than any bought stuff or showpiece kept on display.

Being a minimalist is infact a good thing. It helps one survive any adversity of life. Let life throw any coloured ball, one can basket with the minimum i.e. with just the support of family and friends. Having worked with NGOs, orphanages and old age homes, I’ve learnt that it’s only the little things that matter in life. Being minimalist makes one value people and things more than just knowing the price value of things.

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The good valuable side of Minimalism:

  • Helps to explore life like never before.
  • Enhances body’s natural defense mechanism.
  • Helps to prioritise and select what’s vital.
  • Increases concentration and focus.
  • Results in self-awareness.
  • Teaches to value people over things.
  • Boosts inner strength and confidence.
  • Teaches to appreciate life and every little life event.
  • Helps to overlook mistakes and forgive others.
  • Instills humility by overcoming ego and pride.
  • Foster better interpersonal relationships.
  • Brings joy and inner peace.
  • Helps to cherish memories.
  • Teaches to be grateful to the Almighty.

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Value of minimalism is greater than maximalism because the price of anything is the amount of life one exchanges for it. Instead of learning the price value of things, one must learn to value people and things. Money can’t buy happiness but memories can, the reason why one must invest more time on making memories than spend it on buying luxurious materialistic things.

The secret to having everything one wants out of life is the realizaton that one really doesn’t want most of the things one thinks one wants. Maturity is gradually accepting the fact that not all things that can be counted actually matter, and not all things that matter can actually be counted. Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication and less is the new more.

“Family, friends, food and oxygen are the threshold minimum for existence and sanity.”                                                                  – Sadaf Siddiqi.


This writing piece of mine, was part of a collaboration with a purpose, the topic being- Minimalism.

The following collaborators, from different countries of the world, participated in this writing event. Do read their take on the same topic:

  • Barb Caffrey (“So, if you believe in any sort of Higher Power, one of the things you need to remember is to forgive yourself once in a while.”)
  • Divyang Shah (“If someone don’t speak much, don’t interpret as a dumb, their mind must be working on something big or may be he is a writer.”)
  • Gelyka Dumaraos (“Being more with less by embracing a simple life.”)
  • Ipuna Black (“None of us are perfect or come from perfect backgrounds, but this doesn’t mean we can’t aim for a positive and fulfilling life.”)
  • Jane Love (“People who have a genuine say and a true voice of their own not just an echo of some celebrity they think they love.”)
  • Mylene C. Orillo (“Where I’m at right now is a testament that ‘Dreams really do come true.”)
  • Sadaf Siddiqi (“The best thing about memories, is one doesn’t realise they are making memories but once recorded, it just rewinds and takes one back to the beautiful series of life.”)
  • Sonyo Estavillo (“I am here to champion anyone from the successful and confident folks, to those that are clinically depressed.”)
  • Nicolle K (“Success, for me, is when I spend my days feeling happy, peaceful, fulfilled and without fear of lack.”)
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10 thoughts on “Value of Minimalism.”

  1. “Minimalism is subtraction for the sake of focus.” This and the very last quote I am going to take away from this excellent article. Thank you Sadaf for your wise words and also all the others who collaborated on this post.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You quoted wonderful and wise words, Sadaf! I loved your quote on focus too! Another line I loved is “not all things that can be counted actually matter, and not all things that matter can actually be counted.” Very true and well said. The greatest blessings often can’t be counted and quantified.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Such a wonderfully penned article by you, Sadaf. I’m so crazy, cross-eyed and going gaga over it. I meant to say I love the quotes you used. I thought Sonyo quoted you. I completely agree: “Family, friends, food and oxygen are the threshold minimum for existence and sanity.”

    Liked by 1 person

  4. This was my favorite quote, Sadaf: People tend to give too much meaning to things, thus often forsaking health, relationships, growth, passions, and desires.

    Absolutely correct, and I’m glad you put it into your writing that way.

    I also love the quote Ipuna picked above about “family, friends, food and oxygen,” as that about sums it up. Agree with the quotes, your writing is always full of wisdom. (I’d probably add meaningful work that you love to do, if you’re fortunate enough to have a true passion because not everyone is. The good thing is, you are following your passion and focusing completely on your work.)

    At any rate, I loved this awesome article. Great job!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I super love this paragraph: “There’s a saying, ‘too many cooks spoil the broth,’ which is indeed very true. If one tries juggling too many things at the same time then unfortunately sooner or later, everything will fall apart. To prevent this mishap, minimalism can act as one of the best saviour. Minimalism is not subtraction for the sake of subtraction, it is subtraction for the sake of focus.’ I love your take on this topic. Keep writing and inspiring, Sadaf. Absolutely agree, I think minimalism is not being selfish, it’s just trying to bring the focus on something that matters more. Wonderfully written post!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I believe in the concept of doing too much ends up causing all of your efforts to sort of crumble. It’s all about simplicity and taking things one day at a time and one thing at a time.

    When we try and do too much, we lose touch of the lesson we’re supposed to learn along the way. It’s not just about the goal, but about the journey towards our chosen destination.

    Simplicity equals more focus. Thanks for writing it.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Very Nice Write up, Sadaf! We all need some sort of minimalism in our lives ! I really like the way you write each topic with so much honesty and truth. Thanks for the meaningful articles, Sadaf.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Wonderful article, Sadaf! I like how you wrote about the benefits of minimalism in contrast to maximilism (thanks for introducing a new term for me) and added some great quotes. You are so wise, Sadaf. My favourite line is: “Minimalism is not subtraction for the sake of subtraction, it is subtraction for the sake of focus.”

    Also, sorry for being so late in reading your article! Let’s just say I got caught up with stuff. Very sorry.

    Liked by 1 person

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